Tournament of Books Round 1: A Tale for the Time Being vs How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia

Today I have less to say because the book I read and enjoyed (but which didn’t quite make it to my favourites of the year list), A Tale for the Time Being, won over the book I haven’t read. After reading the judgement, I’m probably more inclined to read How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, but probably only enough to borrow it from the library, if it becomes available.

I was trying to read as many of the tournament entries as possible, but there are still only two first round match ups for which I’ve read both books (and I’ve even written 42-word book reviews of all four!).

Stripy Baby Vest

I haven’t done anything very crafty for a while, but I did just finish this vest for a friend’s baby (who is yet to be born! Usually, I don’t finish baby presents until the intended recipient is at least 6 months old. Let’s not go into whether this is the same baby I originally started the project for…).

vest

 

Completing this project also means that my ravelry projects page is a nice grid of pictures, with no unfinished items taunting me with their empty boxes!

Tournament of Books Round 1: The Luminaries vs Hill William

The Tournament of Books has begun! I actually missed the play-in round, in which Life After Life by Kate Atkinson (one of my favourite books of last year) beat Woke Up Lonely. I haven’t read Woke Up Lonely, and the judging commentary didn’t make me regret that.

There was some controversy in the comments, where it was revealed that the author of Hill William had tried to withdraw from the competition by means of a cryptic facebook post. Luckily for him, the ToB organisers don’t care what the authors think, so it stayed in the tournament.

In the first round, the 200-page, indie-published Hill William, took on the 834-page, Booker-Prize-winning The Luminaries.

Surprisingly,¬†Rachel Fershleiser chose Hill William over The Luminaries, although she didn’t sound that enthusiastic about either book.¬†Fershleiser saw The Luminaries as just another Dead White Guy novel, and it is certainly an homage to that kind of book. She didn’t appreciate the understated writing of the characters, claims erroneously that it wouldn’t pass the Bechdel test (two female characters isn’t a lot, but they certainly discuss more than just a man), and can only muster half-hearted respect for the structure. Somehow Hill William gets points for being “real” because it describes violence and abuse in ugly language.

Sometimes when reading ToB judgements, I get the impression that the judge enjoys the power of unilaterally knocking out a favourite book. In a case where you don’t really like either book, why not give the win to the more ambitious and skillfully crafted book, otherwise? In his commentary, Kevin Guilfoile contrasts the judging with the Sochi men’s figure skating, where the gold medal went to someone who fell 3 times while attempting a difficult routine. But this is like penalising the skater who gave a technically impressive and ambitious performance for not being graceful enough and giving the gold to the amateur skater who stuck it to the establishment by performing to punk rock or something.

Unsurprisingly, Jeremy was also outraged by the decision:

My winner: The Luminaries

we apologise for the interruption in service

We just spent 6 days in Hong Kong and Macau, which was great (I was hoping that this week would be Hong Kong Week, but I’m still going through the photos), but it’s hard to blog while travelling. We leave next Monday on a much larger adventure involving 8 countries (or maybe more!). So we’re a little caught up in trying to get organised and get some work done in preparation. Maybe we’ll get the hang of doing trip reports from the road this time (except for when we’re on a cruise ship with no internet…).